Lost Your Passion for Music: Here Are Four Ways To Motivate Yourself Once Again

January 7, 2020

Making music can be incredibly rewarding, but sometimes the magic fades. When a once-passionate musician starts to feel bored or unmotivated, it can feel like an important part of life has been lost. Fortunately, there are some easy ways to rekindle the passion when it dies down, a quick look at four of which follows:

1. Try a Change of Environment

Creating music is an inherently extroverted activity, even for generally shy, retiring musicians. It is necessary to be keenly attuned to one’s surroundings to make music of any value or substance.

When the required feeling is no longer there, simply practicing or performing in a different space can help summon it again. Some musicians find that too many middling rehearsals or performances in one place spoil the setting for good.

Fortunately, there are some easy ways to shake things up and come at music from a fresh, rejuvenated place. That is true even of cases where the instruments and equipment needed to make music could be difficult to move.

Simply try visiting pianomoversoftexas.com, for instance, and it will be seen that arranging to have something as substantial as a grand piano moved is not difficult at all. Whether that means getting set up in a new rehearsal space in town or simply using a different room at home, a change of scenery can be inspiring.

2. Buy a New Instrument or Piece of Equipment

Just about every musician has a favorite instrument or piece of gear, and such objects can become the subjects of intense feelings. When the urge to make music fades, that ennui can even become associated with what were once a musician’s most treasured possessions.

Adding a new instrument, amplifier, or electronic gadget to a musical stable can get the passion burning again. It might seem overly materialistic for such a creative undertaking, but new musical tools can give rise to equally novel feelings.

That often proves particularly true for musicians who make the effort to push their limits with new acquisitions. An accomplished guitarist who buys and plays a banjo for the first time, for instance, will necessarily look at music from a fresh perspective.

3. Learn Some (More) Theory

Many musicians are proudly self-taught and like to let their instincts guide them. When the desire to make music starts to fade, though, having a bit of theoretical knowledge to fall back on can help get it going again.

Fortunately, learning music theory has never been easier. Free, online courses covering the subject in-depth can provide the kinds of education that were once reserved for full-time students.

Even a musician who already knows the difference between the Mixolydian and Locrian modes can benefit from cracking the books. Learning more music theory inevitably means becoming exposed to ideas that encourage musical experimentation and creation.

4. Listen to Something Different

Some musicians end up spending decades exploring particular genres or styles of music. When making music no longer seems as satisfying as in the past, seeking out markedly different sources of inspiration can help.

That can mean anything from diving deeper into the back catalog of a beloved artist to exploring a far-off country’s folk traditions. There are so many wonderful kinds of music to be listened to and enjoyed that there should never be a dearth of options.

The Passion For Music Never Truly Dies

Most musicians who become ambivalent about making music find that shaking things up helps. Strategies like the four listed above consistently prove helpful to musicians who are trying to recover an especially rewarding sort of passion.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *